Tess Holliday cools off with an ice lolly while enjoying a day out at Disneyland 

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Tess Holliday cools off with an ice lolly while enjoying a day out at Disneyland 

Tess Holliday cooled off with an ice lolly as she enjoyed a fun-filled day out at Disneyland in sun-soaked Flordia on Thursday.The American plus-si

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Tess Holliday cooled off with an ice lolly as she enjoyed a fun-filled day out at Disneyland in sun-soaked Flordia on Thursday.

The American plus-size model, 36, donned a black netted top and black mini skirt for the outing, alongwith a pair of custom studded black Mickey Mouse ears.

Tess shared a slew of snaps from the day on her Instagram Stories, as she encouraged fans to come and greet her and said it was a ‘sweaty day’. 

Sun-soaked day: Tess Holliday cooled off with an ice lolly as she enjoyed a fun-filled day out at Disneyland in sun-soaked Flordia on Thursday

Sun-soaked day: Tess Holliday cooled off with an ice lolly as she enjoyed a fun-filled day out at Disneyland in sun-soaked Flordia on Thursday

Tess, who recently opened up about her battle with anorexia, wore her flame-hued tresses in a loose style before sweeping them up into a ponytail.

Tess carried her essentials in a Daffy Duck bag and stayed hydrated by ensuring she had a bottle of water with her at the amusement park.

Sharing a series of selfies on her social media, Tess wrote: ‘Back at my fav place! If you see me today say hi!’ 

Casual: The American plus-size model, 36, donned a black netted top and black mini skirt for the outing, alongwith a pair of custom studded black Mickey Mouse ears

Casual: The American plus-size model, 36, donned a black netted top and black mini skirt for the outing, alongwith a pair of custom studded black Mickey Mouse ears

Come see me! Sharing a series of selfies on her social media, Tess wrote: 'Back at my fav place! If you see me today say hi!'

Selfie: Tess, who recently opened up about her battle with anorexia, wore her flame-hued tresses in a loose style before sweeping them up into a ponytail

Come see me! Sharing a series of selfies on her social media, Tess wrote: ‘Back at my fav place! If you see me today say hi!’

Tess also shared clips while enjoying some of the park’s rides.

At the end of the day, she wrote: ‘Such a special, exhausting and sweaty day.’

Earlier this year, Tess spoke about how she is ‘anorexic and in recovery’, after decades of struggling with body image and backlash over her weight. 

Tess, who found fame as a plus-size model and a body-positivity activist, took to social media over the weekend to open up about her eating disorder in response to her growing frustration with people commenting on her weight and health. 

‘I’m anorexic and in recovery. I’m not ashamed to say it out loud anymore,’ she tweeted. ‘I’m the result of a culture that celebrates thinness and equates that to worth, but I get to write my own narrative now. I’m finally able to care for a body that I’ve punished my entire life and I am finally free.’

Sweet: At the end of the day, she wrote: 'Such a special, exhausting and sweaty day'

Woo! Tess also shared clips while enjoying some of the park's rides

Sweet: At the end of the day, she wrote: ‘Such a special, exhausting and sweaty day’

Honest: Tess tweeted about her eating disorder on Saturday, saying she is the 'result of a culture that celebrates thinness'

Honest: Tess tweeted about her eating disorder on Saturday, saying she is the ‘result of a culture that celebrates thinness’

The body-positivity activist explained in another post shared on Instagram that she has lost weight while healing from her eating disorder and has been inundated with people encouraging her to lose more.   

‘To everyone that keeps saying “you’re looking healthy lately” or “You are losing weight, keep it up!” Stop. Don’t. Comment. On. My. Weight. Or. Perceived. Health. Keep. It. To. Yourself. Thanks,’ she wrote.  

‘I’m healing from an eating disorder and feeding my body regularly for the first time in my entire life,’ she noted. 

‘When you equate weight loss with “health” and place value and worth on someone’s size, you are basically saying that we are more valuable now because we are smaller and perpetuating diet culture… and that’s corny as hell. NOT here for it.’

Triggering: The plus-size model warned people on Twitter and Instagram to keep their comments about her weight to themselves

Triggering: The plus-size model warned people on Twitter and Instagram to keep their comments about her weight to themselves 

Happy: The body-positivity activist, pictured in March, said she is now able to 'care for' for the body she 'punished' her entire life and is 'finally free'

Happy: The body-positivity activist, pictured in March, said she is now able to ‘care for’ for the body she ‘punished’ her entire life and is ‘finally free’

The mother of two added that people’s positive comments about her weight loss are triggering to both her and others.  

‘For folks like me that are trying to reframe our relationships with our bodies and heal, hearing comments about weight is triggering as hell,’ she said. 

‘It sets us back in our progress — and when people working on themselves see you commenting to me that way, it hurts THEM, not just me. I can take it (I shouldn’t have to, but I can) but they didn’t ask for that trauma, ok?’

Tess ended her post with a warning, saying: ‘If you can’t tell someone they look nice without making it about their size, then baby, please don’t say nuthin at all.’

The social media star received plenty of messages of support from fans, inspiring some to open up about their own eating disorders. 

WHAT IS ATYPICAL ANOREXIA?

Anorexia nervosa is an eating disorder characterized by weight loss, a fear of gaining weight, and a distorted body image.

People with anorexia generally restrict their calories and types of foods they eat. They may also exercise compulsively, purge via vomiting and laxatives, and/or binge eat.

When people think of anorexia, they normally think of a person of extremely low weight. However, a person with atypical anorexia nervosa does not have this symptom of the disease.  

Studies have found that people with larger bodies can also have anorexia. 

In 2013, the American Psychiatric Association added atypical anorexia nervosa to the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5).

The DSM is used worldwide and contains sets of diagnostic criteria to help clinicians diagnose mental health problems. 

Atypical anorexia has all the criteria of anorexia met, except significant weight loss. The individual’s weight is within or above the normal range.

According to the DSM-5 criteria, to be diagnosed with either atypical anorexia or tradition anorexia, they must have:

  • Persistent restriction of energy intake (in the case of anorexia, leading to significantly low body weight)
  • Either an intense fear of gaining weight or of becoming fat or persistent behavior that interferes with weight gain (even if significantly low weight)
  • Disturbance in the way one’s body weight or shape is experienced, undue influence of body shape and weight on self-evaluation, or persistent lack of recognition of the seriousness of the potentially low body weight

Sometimes atypical anorexia is considered an ‘other specified feeding or eating disorder’ (OSFED).

Source: National Eating Disorders Association (NEDA)

Anorexia nervosa is an eating disorder characterized by weight loss, a fear of gaining weight, and a distorted body image, according to the National Eating Disorders Association (NEDA). 

People with anorexia generally restrict their calories and types of foods they eat. They may also ‘exercise compulsively, purge via vomiting and laxatives, and/or binge eat.’ 

While anorexia is typically associated with low body weight, studies have found that people with larger bodies can also have anorexia. 

Atypical anorexia nervosa was formally recognized in 2013 and is diagnosed in patients who don’t have the usual low body weight synonymous with the disorder. 

NEDA noted that larger-bodied individuals struggling with the eating disorder ‘may be less likely to be diagnosed due to cultural prejudice against fat and obesity.’ 

Boudoir shoot: Tess, pictured in August 2020, is known for sharing racy photos of herself online. In a recent tweet, she insisted that she can have anorexia and still love herself

Boudoir shoot: Tess, pictured in August 2020, is known for sharing racy photos of herself online. In a recent tweet, she insisted that she can have anorexia and still love herself 

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