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Couple behind stunning Tasmanian retreat in the wilderness share renovating lessons learned

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The couple behind a stunning wilderness retreat nestled deep in the far-south of Tasmania have shared the 10 lessons they learned while renovating their boutique luxury accommodation. 

The Voyager comprises an immaculately renovated two-storey, adults-only, waterfront cabin south of the waterside town of Dover, at Strathblane. 

It was a labour of love for Megan Newbery, 33, and her partner, who spent years juggling busy Melbourne weekday jobs with transforming the old cabin into the incredible space you see today.

But now, their hard work is paying dividends – with the cabin available to rent on Airbnb, and guests flooding through the remote doors all year round.

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The couple behind a stunning wilderness retreat nestled deep in the far-south of Tasmania have shared the 10 lessons they learned while renovating their boutique luxury accommodation (The Voyager in Tasmania pictured)

The couple behind a stunning wilderness retreat nestled deep in the far-south of Tasmania have shared the 10 lessons they learned while renovating their boutique luxury accommodation (The Voyager in Tasmania pictured)

The Voyager comprises an immaculately renovated two-storey, adults-only, waterfront cabin located 10 minutes south of the waterside town of Dover, at Strathblane (interiors pictured)

The Voyager comprises an immaculately renovated two-storey, adults-only, waterfront cabin located 10 minutes south of the waterside town of Dover, at Strathblane (interiors pictured)

It was a labour of love for Megan Newbery, 33, and her partner, who spent years juggling busy Melbourne weekday jobs with transforming the old cabin into the incredible space you see today (kitchen pictured)

It was a labour of love for Megan Newbery, 33, and her partner, who spent years juggling busy Melbourne weekday jobs with transforming the old cabin into the incredible space you see today (kitchen pictured)

‘We learned so much on our journey, a lot by trial and error,’ Megan told FEMAIL.

One of the most important lessons they learned during renovating was that you need to allow time – and a lot of it – to ensure things get done right.

‘Give yourself extra time,’ Megan said.

‘No matter the time frame a trade or supplier gives you, add an extra few days at least for the unexpected and things that will one hundred per cent will go wrong.’

Secondly, Megan said you should have a ‘spreadsheet inside each and every room’ alongside the tasks you want to do and the expected completion dates.

This way, both you can see what you need to do, while the tradespeople can see what’s coming next.

Megan said very aspect has been thoughtfully designed and purposefully chosen to create a balanced blend of rustic charm complemented by modern convenience (interiors pictured)

Megan said very aspect has been thoughtfully designed and purposefully chosen to create a balanced blend of rustic charm complemented by modern convenience (interiors pictured)

Megan said very aspect has been thoughtfully designed and purposefully chosen to create a balanced blend of rustic charm complemented by modern convenience (interiors pictured)

The 10 renovation lessons everyone needs to know 

1. Give yourself extra time: Add at least an extra few days for things that will go wrong.

2. Have a spreadsheet for each room: On this, you can put the tasks you want to do and expected completion dates.

3. Write everything down: This includes the scope of works, plans, costs and expected completion dates.

4. Visual examples are key: No matter how bad your sketch is, draw what you’re envisioning. 

5. Timeline backwards: This starts from completion date and works backwards so you can see what you’re dealing with.

6. Get three quotes: Make sure you do this for everything, no exceptions. 

7. Remember some things will go wrong: Breathe through this and deal with it rationally.

8. Document every stage: This is because you’ll want to look back on all of it in years to come.

9. Stick to your budget: But you should also have an emergency budget in place, as things might go wrong.

10. Be on-site as much as possible: If you’re not there, mistakes will happen. Try and be there as much as you can. 

 

One of the most important lessons they learned during renovating was that you need to allow time - and a lot of it - to ensure things get done right (interiors pictured)

One of the most important lessons they learned during renovating was that you need to allow time – and a lot of it – to ensure things get done right (interiors pictured)

Secondly, Megan said you should have a'spreadsheet inside each and every room' alongside the tasks you want to do and the expected completion dates (interiors pictured)

Secondly, Megan said you should have a ‘spreadsheet inside each and every room’ alongside the tasks you want to do and the expected completion dates (interiors pictured)

The third thing Megan said she learned while renovating the beautiful Voyager property is a ‘no brainer’, but still so often people forget to do it.

She said you absolutely must ‘write everything down’ including the scope of the works, plans, costs and expected completion dates.

This helps because if plans go awry, you can always refer back to your notes and it also helps to avoid disappointment, as it means everything is clear and everyone is on the same page.

‘Visual examples are key, no matter how sh*t your little sketch might be,’ Megan added.

Draw out what you’re envisioning rather than describing it for the best results.

Megan from The Voyager recommends that you always have visual examples, as a little drawing will always help others with understanding what they need to do

Megan from The Voyager recommends that you always have visual examples, as a little drawing will always help others with understanding what they need to do

Megan from The Voyager recommends that you always have visual examples, as a little drawing will always help others with understanding what they need to do 

Elsewhere, the talented home renovator said you should'timeline backwards' so you work from your date of completion backwards to see how things should be done

Elsewhere, the talented home renovator said you should ‘timeline backwards’ so you work from your date of completion backwards to see how things should be done

Elsewhere, the talented home renovator said you should ‘timeline backwards’ so you work from your date of completion backwards to see how things should be done.

You should also ‘get three quotes, no exceptions’, remember that some things will go wrong and you’ll need to breathe through it and document every little stage of the process, as it’s something you’ll want to look back on in years to come.

‘Stick to your budget,’ Megan added, saying you should have an emergency budget in place as things can go wrong.

Finally, she said you should be on-site as much as possible, as if you’re not there mistakes will be made and oversights will happen.

‘Most can be fixed, but it will cost you time – which is second only to money,’ she said. 

From the timbers for the rustic doors, walls and skirting, which were salvaged from reclaimed jetties in Launceston and Dover, to original Tasmanian oak flooring, The Voyager effortlessly blends Tasmanian heritage with European elements (pictured)

From the timbers for the rustic doors, walls and skirting, which were salvaged from reclaimed jetties in Launceston and Dover, to original Tasmanian oak flooring, The Voyager effortlessly blends Tasmanian heritage with European elements (pictured)

You should also'get three quotes, no exceptions', remember that some things will go wrong and you'll need to breathe through it and document every little stage of the process, as it's something you'll want to look back on in years to come

You should also'get three quotes, no exceptions', remember that some things will go wrong and you'll need to breathe through it and document every little stage of the process, as it's something you'll want to look back on in years to come

You should also ‘get three quotes, no exceptions’, remember that some things will go wrong and you’ll need to breathe through it and document every little stage of the process, as it’s something you’ll want to look back on in years to come

The Voyager starts from $600 per night for two people, but it sleeps up to eight (one of the bedrooms pictured)

The Voyager starts from $600 per night for two people, but it sleeps up to eight (one of the bedrooms pictured)

Sitting mere metres from the Esperance River, the Voyager is brimming with Tasmanian heritage.

Megan said very aspect has been thoughtfully designed and purposefully chosen to create a balanced blend of rustic charm complemented by modern convenience. 

From the timbers for the rustic doors, walls and skirting, which were salvaged from reclaimed jetties in Launceston and Dover, to original Tasmanian oak flooring, it effortlessly blends this heritage with several European elements.

For instance, the large rustic dining table is an original piece from an 18th century French monastery and there are Moroccan handmade, white, ceramic clay tiles.

Those who have been lucky enough to stay at the property have left it glowing reviews on Airbnb, where it has been described as a'little slice of paradise' and'beautiful' (exterior pictured)

Those who have been lucky enough to stay at the property have left it glowing reviews on Airbnb, where it has been described as a'little slice of paradise' and'beautiful' (exterior pictured)

Those who have been lucky enough to stay at the property have left it glowing reviews on Airbnb, where it has been described as a ‘little slice of paradise’ and ‘beautiful’ (exterior pictured)

Those who have been lucky enough to stay at the property have left it glowing reviews on Airbnb, where it has been described as a ‘little slice of paradise’ and ‘beautiful’.

‘Ridiculously stunning!’ one person wrote. 

‘We had big plans to explore the area during our stay, however the moment we stepped into this home – we felt so relaxed and spent days just loving the space and kayaking on the river. We had an incredible time!’

Another added: ‘The Voyager is absolutely picture perfect with incredible views from every window in the house. Complete seclusion and privacy, in a breathtaking waterfront location.’

The Voyager starts from $600 per night for two people, but it sleeps up to eight.

For more information about The Voyager, you can visit the website here



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